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  1. I used to work in the insurance industry as a security surveyor from 1965 to 1986. Until 1970 I was London based, and used to regularly meet with alarm company surveyors. – Granley amongst all the other NSCIA approved companies. I well remember David Levy of Granley and his main surveyor Peter Peters. From 1970 I was Leicester based, and spent much time socialising in the Granley Leicester office with David Clowes.

  2. I worked at Granley’s from ’67-’77 so FYI phone# bis 4080 was used at their first office at 10 Great eastern st EC2 [corner building] following rapid expansion they moved [1965ish] to 44-48 Gt eastern st and phone # sho [739] 9696. got bought by the Chloride group 1975ish and later RCA and later Securicor.
    Andy’s right, the Co. was started at 48 Kingsland Rd as a TV/radio repair shop[Kingsland radio] by brothers Josh and Nat Granby and friend David Levy, ‘Granley products’ was the name used to sell their invention of a ‘pressure mat’ and was quickly replaced by ‘Granley burglar alarms’ for the installation Co. David Levy’s son Simon follows his dad as an inventor!

    • Thank you for this superb bit of burglar alarm history. I always enjoy a Granley box (especially a rare stencilled Chloride Granley one). So Granley is an amalgam of Granby and Levy. Clever the way they got to keep their name on for so long, even after the various takeovers.

      • Happy that old memories of some of my best years are of interest to another generation! Coincidentally I started work the same day as your namesake Vic Macdonald [Victormac], and stayed friends ’till his untimely death last year.

    • Great piece of history. Who, what and where was Simon Levy’s claim to fame as an inventor? Where did Lou Vale’s Informer Burglar Alarm company fit in to all this. Think there was a connection as the actual metal bell box was the same and he sold Granly logoed contacts and pressure mats.

      • Simon Levy has invented a room sanitising hand drier [Sterillo] and is currently looking for technical sales support [www.prweek.com/ article/ 1331090/ dyson-rival-call]
        . Lou Vale [may have been a family friend] sold Granley’s products through Exchange and Mart etc. as Informer burglar alarms, to the ‘private market’, being those who chose an alarm, as opposed to those obliged by their insurance Co to have an ‘approved’ alarm, the difference in price being large! but the products the same.
        At this period Granleys were a quantum leap ahead of the competition with high tech in house designs and products. While AFA and Reliabell were still hard wiring relays and electromechanics, we had solid state modular equipment, microwave motion detectors [MWDs {before Sadam Hussain didn’t have his}] Electronic vibration analisers [EVAs] and Self actuating bells [SABs]

        • Pretty good everyone but, it’s Stephen not Simon.

          Dad is 88 and still going strong. If any of you remember him, do say hi and he will reply – I’m sure. He spends his spare time building PC’s and showing his octogenarian friends how to use the internet!!!!

  3. You may wish to investigate further. I have always thought that the bell box in yest6erdays example had a sticker over them, with the original being todays examp0le. I have noted on the type shown yesterday, that you can sometimes see writing underneath the logo, as shown above. There are still loads of Granly bell boxes around.

      • Not sure if I mentioned this before, but the Granly name was made up of the surnames of the two original owners. I cant remember there first names (before my time), but think one was Granby and the other Levy. You may also come across other bell boxes that read ‘Granly Security Systems’ a metal oblong shaped box, RCA Security Systems – the same box but with RCA on it. RCA took them over. Before RCA, at some point they were called ‘Chloride Granly’. Later on they became Securicor Granly before ending up as Initial Security Systems.

      • To help with date placing bell boxes, above, Granley products in diagonal script sticker + bis 4080 with wooden backplate is a first period box. They are just starting out at Gt eastern st, early ’60s
        Granley burglar alarm diagonal capitals printed + bis4080 with metal backplate – second period. They form an ‘approved’ alarm Co to install
        Granley burglar alarm yellow capitals printed +sho9696 – third They move to #s 44-46-48 Gt eastern st.

        ————–ditto———- 739 9696 std phone#—fourth.
        Granley GP security sticker, an attempt to rebrand and create a company logo with GP following the stock exchange floatation,[1972ish] –fifth.
        Chloride granley post ’75ish

        • As some of the readers of this blog may have realised the firms and the equipment of yesteryear really do fascinate me. Granly and the like we’re still trading when my interest in the industry first started. What set them apart from today’s firms including my own is that the company’s designed and built all there own equipment in the main instead of using the mass produced equipment that came along later and plagues our industry today. In those days bell boxes were made of metal and not the polycarbonate we use today which they tell us has the same strength as a 1.2 mm steal box. In those days on the Chubb Alarm bell boxes I used to fit it only took a few turns of the top left bolt before the bell started ringing and another 10 minutes to undo the remainder of the bolt. Over the years I have taken down countless Granly, Chloride, RCA, Securicor Granly, Arlescourt, Shield, Sheild Protection, Chubb, Shorrock, Security Centres, Rely-a-Bell, Modern Alarms, ADT, AFA, Banham, Radam Electrosystems, the odd Combat Alarm and a few Aerial Alarms. All these were proper systems not the silly wire free systems we are all fitting today.
          The only bell box to completely evade me is a white Brocks bell box with the gold lion on the front.

            • The Informer was originally an early small domestic Granley Alarm system. ”it won a ‘best buy’ award in the Which magazine and suddenly took off and needed a different marketing approach to commercial alarms. This task was given to Lou Vale, a great salesman.
              DL
              incidentally, The Granley Bell Box never had a wooden backplate – always anodised steel.

              • Hi David,

                Delighted to see you on here. We have never met but Im sure I could bore you for hours

                Your company was one of the firms that inspired me into this industry many many moons ago.

                Over the years I have, In the way that is not intended in any way derogatory, have taken down many Granly Bells and taken over and updated many systems – mainly on United Syn sites which your company did for many many years.

                I’m 49 and so my knowledge and experience doesn’t go back as far as yours but I remember with great fondness the TM15 control unit and the TM10 control unit.

                My uncle had a Granly System in his antique shop in Kensington with all the walls and ceilings lace wired. The system had window foil and Aritech Ultrasonic detectors. I still remember him setting the system with the internal bell ringing during setting. He would close the final exit and lock (shunt lock) the door. A buzzer would then sound with a little LED fitted in the door frame. When the light lit he pressed a button to extinguish it – I guess it was for ‘Return Path Signalling’.

                I remember ‘The Informer Burglar Alarm’ being sold in Exchange and Mart – I am aware that Lou Vale was the guy behind this, but was The Informer a ‘Granly company’?

                When did your involvement cease?

                Unlike your contemporaries such as Brocks, AFA, Shield and Rely-A-Bell there are still loads of Granly Bells in and around London. You have a great legacy!

              • Hi David,

                Delighted to see you on here. We have never met but Im sure I could bore you for hours with all the questions I would have for you.

                Your company was one of the firms that inspired me into this industry many many moons ago.

                Over the years I have, In the way that is not intended in any way derogatory, have taken down many Granly Bells and taken over and updated many systems – mainly on United Syn sites which your company did for many many years.

                I’m 49 and so my knowledge and experience doesn’t go back as far as yours but I remember with great fondness the TM15 control unit and the TM10 control unit.

                My uncle had a Granly System in his antique shop in Kensington with all the walls and ceilings lace wired. The system had window foil and Aritech Ultrasonic detectors. I still remember him setting the system with the internal bell ringing during setting. He would close the final exit and lock (shunt lock) the door. A buzzer would then sound with a little LED fitted in the door frame. When the light lit he pressed a button to extinguish it – I guess it was for ‘Return Path Signalling’.

                I remember ‘The Informer Burglar Alarm’ being sold in Exchange and Mart – I am aware that Lou Vale was the guy behind this, but was The Informer a ‘Granly company’?

                When did your involvement in Granly cease?

                Unlike your contemporaries such as Brocks, AFA, Shield and Rely-A-Bell there are still loads of Granly Bells in and around London. You have a great legacy!

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