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Rugby

“Sentry Alarms”, Rugby: old guard

"Sentry Alarms" burglar alarm, Rugby • So, after a brief musical interlude, we're back with the mega-militia theme, this time with sounders boasting guards and sentries. To kick things off in Rugby (ha ha), here's one I've already shown small as part of the "decay" theme, but it's ancient enough to be worth repeating close-up – I'm always a sucker for geographical phone codes. • Spotted: Gas Street, Rugby, Warwickshire, CV21, England, 2011 • Politics: In the Conservative constituency of Rugby
“Sentry Alarms”, Rugby: old guard

“Panther Security”, Rugby: pedantic

"Panther Security" burglar alarm, Rugby • This streetwise, stencilled logo looks like an identity for a computer war game, or a brand of outdoors wear. To be pedantic, the panther is not a specific species, but a blanket term for big cats in general, such as jaguars, cougars, or leopards. The black panther is the "melanistic" variant of these, the small percentage with a very dark pigment – usually jaguars or leopards, which have long been bred in captivity for their beauty – and the word "panther" is often used to refer to these inky beasts in particular. This is most clearly a black panther, so assuming the security firm isn't paying homage to the militant African American revolutionary group, it's actually a leopard or a jaguar. This one can be found stalking along Sheep Street, Rugby – which is perhaps why there aren't any actual sheep there. • Spotted: Sheep Street, Rugby, Warwickshire, CV21, England, 2011 • Politics: In the Conservative constituency of Rugby A real black panther, ie a melanistic jaguar (photo by Cburnett)
“Panther Security”, Rugby: pedantic

“Sentry Alarms”, Rugby: guarding Gas Street

"Sentry Alarms" burglar alarm, Rugby • An elderly alarm on a house that looks beyond burglary. This was found in the famous public school town of Rugby (birthplace of the boring game), where even decay in a road called Gas Street looks salubrious. In my experience, industrial sounding locations like Ferry Road, Electric Avenue or Gas Street always prove to be interesting; places with posh names like Manor Road are generally downmarket (there will be an example soon); and you can always park in Park Street. Fact! • Spotted: Gas Street, Rugby, Warwickshire, CV21, England, 2011 • Politics: In the Conservative constituency of Rugby
“Sentry Alarms”, Rugby: guarding Gas Street

“Dove”, Rugby: the burglar alarm of peace

"Dove Security Systems" burglar alarm, Rugby • An unusual bird choice for an anti-theft device: the allegedly sweet-natured dove, traditional symbol of peace and love. The simplified dove-with-olive-branch graphic popular with peace movements today derives from a post-WWII design by Picasso, but even though this photo is blurred (the alarm was really high up and shot at dusk), I can tell it's not one of Pablo's. Presumably that is an olive branch in its beak, though it looks more like a leech – which would be appropriate to represent a burglar, but seems unlikely. Technically, as a branch of the Columbidae family, the dove is just a small non-feral pigeon. But "Small Non-Feral Pigeon Security Systems" doesn't have quite the same ring. • Spotted: Market Place, Rugby, Warwickshire, CV21, England, 2011 • Politics: In the Conservative constituency of Rugby
“Dove”, Rugby: the burglar alarm of peace